Wood window sash RX!

From the desk of Mark Sirvin:

As we move full speed ahead into 2020 with all the challenges another year brings, we need to prioritize our to do list going forward. Purchase a new vehicle, plan that vacation we've been putting off for the past few years or pay off some credit card bills? Where should we rank our homes windows? I'm not sure about you, but most of us pay little to no attention when it comes to the windows in our home until there's a problem. Do you know what it cost's on average to replace windows for one's home? You can always finance the project, right! That right there speaks volumes about what you can expect to spend, when so many companies offer you finance options for years, just like a car loan. On average you can spend $500 for low end basic vinyl windows to upwards near $1,000 for higher end aluminum clad wood or fiberglass windows. Plus extra features or installation issues can increase those cost's as well.  Sadly what happens to often is that due to a few rotting sashes being an issue, which can be corrected more often than not, we end up jumping to panic mode and replace every window in the home, spending countless dollars more than necessary.

     You have options that can save you money. Who does not like saving money? Here are some proactive steps you can take in order to prevent needlessly replacing the wood windows in your home. First order of business is to inspect your wood windows. Do this yearly. Look for signs of wear and weathering. What condition is the exterior in if you have painted all wood windows? Is the paint cracking or flaking? Has the finish dulled and is chalky? Sand the wood and scrape off all the flaking paint, prime and repaint. Replace failed caulking where needed. When taking these steps, always remember to finish the tops and bottoms of the window sashes. I cannot stress this part enough. You will extend the life of your windows by years and years keeping up on the finishing alone. The finishing of your windows is never a once and done aspect of home ownership. It requires diligence and making it a priority. Also check your windows for worn or brittle weather-stripping. Replace it as necessary. You don't realize how much the lack of having a good weather seal on your windows prevents wear and tear. Another major issue we have addressed with so many of our clients over the years is one you might scratch your head over. But it is one of the biggest factors that contribute to rotting wood sashes. OPEN YOUR WINDOWS!!! Pretty simple, right. So true though. You are causing irreparable harm to any wood or clad wood window if you never open them. We have clients that tell us "I haven't opened the windows in 10 years. I run the air conditioning all year." I'm certainly not advocating or instructing you to open your windows during a rain storm or blizzard, but open them when you can and as often as you can, weather permitting. You are helping the wood to breathe and to dry. Moisture and wood do not mix well together over time, unless you are talking about wood like Accoya.

     If you do need to address some rotting sash problems, reach out to Accurate Custom Sash for advice and direction. See how Accoya wood can help you. We always provide every potential client with our 39 years of industry leading knowledge in wood window repair. You will never experience pressure when talking with us.  

"From the Accoya website"

      Accoya® wood is the perfect material for wooden window frames, external wood doors and exterior window shutters as it offers improved thermal insulation properties in comparison with commonly used hardwood and softwood wood species and it is more durable and dimensionally stable than the best tropical hardwoods. Accoya® wood has an enhanced coatings performance and can last twice as long, saving time, money and hassle. It also has a 50 year above ground guarantee, giving complete confidence that Accoya® windows and doors will stand the test of time. An Accoya® wooden window or door is developed to excel in external applications, even in challenging conditions

       

 


Mark Sirvin
Mark Sirvin

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